How to Polish A Newly Painted Car?

If you’re re-colouring and refinishing your vehicle, once your work with the spray paint gun is complete and your clear coat applied, you might want to add a stunning mirror like gleam to your surface. The cut and polish procedure, also known as colour sanding and buffing, is the key to polishing up your paint work and imparting that show-stopping finish to it.

Done by a seasoned expert, colour sanding by sandpaper or best sanding discs can turn a good paint job into an exceptional one.

SANDING

 

Wet sanding

If the thought of taking sandpaper to your new paintwork seems scary, fear not! You wouldn’t be the first newbie to flinch at the idea. Nevertheless, by following these steps you will take your paint job from impressive to spectacular.

A note before you start; make sure your clear coat has properly cured. If you’re a serious paint job nut – or your best mate is one – you might have access to a baking oven, but if you don’t that’s fine; Leaving your vehicle in the hot Aussie sun for at least 24 hours will do the trick.

  1. Once fully cured you can use a tungsten block to carefully eliminate any of the more prominent nibs of paint of dust before wet sanding. Then use wet sanding to start smoothing your surface with the aim of removing the tiny bumps and ripples in the paint that may have occurred at the paint spray gun stage, frequently referred to as orange peel.
  2. As you sand, you’ll be upping the grade of your sandpaperall the way to micro-fine 3000 grit varieties. The idea is to gradually eliminate the coarser scratches from the paint, levelling the paint’s surface with finer and finer scratches that can eventually be hidden with polish.
  3. Fill a bucket with slightly soapy water and let your sandpaper soak in it for up to an hour before you begin, then wrap it around a soft colour sanding block. Ensure it is a soft block or you risk scratching the paint job. Start by sanding a test area by laying your block flat on the surface and sliding it left and right a few times then moving down and repeating the pattern. Once you start sanding, use even, smooth strokes without pressing too hard and using different stroke directions to achieve a “cross hatching” effect. Start with around 1500 grade (1200 minimum, if the surface is acrylic and the scratches are really bad) and work up to 3000 grit. Some sites recommend starting with paper as low as 400 grade, but do not do this! Anything under 1200 is going to cause more damage than it solves. Use micro-fine sandpaper, which is less sharp than other sandpaper and less likely to damage the surface. You may need to finish the sanding process with 3000 fine-grade sandpaper. This may not be required if your rubbing compound is designed to buff out 2000 grit scratches, but it is highly recommended for the ultimate finish.

BUFFING

 

Buffing

4. If the thought of taking sandpaper to your new paintwork seems scary, fear not! You wouldn’t be the first newbie to flinch at the idea. Nevertheless, by following these steps you will take your paint job from impressive to spectacular.

    • A note before you start; make sure your clear coat has properly cured. If you’re a serious paint job nut – or your best mate is one – you might have access to a baking oven, but if you don’t that’s fine; Leaving your vehicle in the hot Aussie sun for at least 24 hours will do the trick.
    • Once fully cured you can use a tungsten block to carefully eliminate any of the more prominent nibs of paint of dust before wet sanding. Then use wet sanding to start smoothing your surface with the aim of removing the tiny bumps and ripples in the paint that may have occurred at the paint spray gun stage, frequently referred to as orange peel.
    • As you sand, you’ll be upping the grade of your sandpaperall the way to micro-fine 3000 grit varieties. The idea is to gradually eliminate the coarser scratches from the paint, levelling the paint’s surface with finer and finer scratches that can eventually be hidden with polish.
    • Fill a bucket with slightly soapy water and let your sandpaper soak in it for up to an hour before you begin, then wrap it around a soft colour sanding block. Ensure it is a soft block or you risk scratching the paint job. Start by sanding a test area by laying your block flat on the surface and sliding it left and right a few times then moving down and repeating the pattern. Once you start sanding, use even, smooth strokes without pressing too hard and using different stroke directions to achieve a “cross hatching” effect. Start with around 1500 grade (1200 minimum, if the surface is acrylic and the scratches are really bad) and work up to 3000 grit. Some sites recommend starting with paper as low as 400 grade, but do not do this! Anything under 1200 is going to cause more damage than it solves. Use micro-fine sandpaper, which is less sharp than other sandpaper and less likely to damage the surface. You may need to finish the sanding process with 3000 fine-grade sandpaper. This may not be required if your rubbing compound is designed to buff out 2000 grit scratches, but it is highly recommended for the ultimate finish.